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Yes, a well written "identify this bike" question is on-topic.


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I would be of the opinion that this is off topic for the following reasons: Actual condition of items is impossible to judge without inspection, and therefore impossible to price accurately. The price of a whole bike is largely dependent on the included components, and we will frequently get posts where the list or pictures of components will be incomplete. ...


12

Generally yes - questions about wheeled vehicles operated by pedals are generally acceptable regardless of whether said vehicle has 1, 2 or more wheels and irrespective of how you sit on the vehicle. That said, you will still need to make sure that your questions have a broad enough appeal and meet the other condition of the FAQ.


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No, "identify this bike" questions are off-topic.


11

I agree it makes little sense. In particular, questions in the HNQ list show up like this: To me, this is little more than a green heart. I do see the connection - cycling is a healthy activity that also has a low environmental impact. However bikes and cycling are not necessarily the first things that spring to mind when I see a green heart. I'm not a ...


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How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments? I have had to deal with this a few times - in my opinion, the most effective treatment is the standard Stack Exchange treatment: initially a warning, then a short suspension if behaviour doesn't change, ...


10

As far as I am concerned, a unicycle is half a bicycle. It ought to be worth half a question. As long as your question is cycling related or bike mechanics/riding relevant, I say yes. Start asking about circus tents* or non-cycling related material, and I will reserve the right to withdraw that vote. *this is an attempt at humor. No offense is intended.


10

It looks like a head tube badge to me. For what its worth, I like it. A Pennyfarthing wouldn't be as readable in say the tabs at the top of Chrome, but it might work better on the Stackexchange Android app where the logo has too much space around it.


10

I'd suggest asking (and answering) the general question How can I estimate the value of a used bike? Any valuation questions could then be closed as duplicates of the general question.


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No, I don't think "LBS" makes sense to a first time user, or to many people finding answers from a search. It's a term known to much of the cycling community, but most people riding a bicycle won't know that term. Even the term "Local Bike Shop" is problematic. The Walmart in my town sells bicycles, so it must be a local bike shop, right? But that's not ...


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How would you deal with a user who produced a steady stream of valuable answers, but tends to generate a large number of arguments/flags from comments? Why are we here? To build a community of like-minded cyclists of all types. Someone who contributes to the end goal of improving the overall quality and depth of the results should be valued and encouraged....


9

Speaking as someone who votes a lot (actually, as the person who votes the most, both here and on StackExchange as a whole), I wanted to mention a couple of points: Individual votes are not very significant. It's the accumulation of multiple votes from multiple people that marks a good question or answer. A question with several upvotes is probably ...


9

It's perfectly ok to answer your own question. In fact, there's a little checkbox when you're posting a question that allows you to post an answer simultaneously. You can tell this question/answer used that, because the timestamps are identical down to the second. That way, nobody wastes their time working on the same answer the questioner is about to post. ...


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Close them as off topic. Questions seeking product, service, or learning material recommendations are off-topic because they tend to become obsolete quickly. Instead, describe your situation and the specific problem you're trying to solve. They lead new users to believe that shopping questions are ok.


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This behavior is the same across all Stack Exchange sites. Editing a post always bumps it to the front page. On busier sites there may be so much activity that the post does not remain on the front page for very long, but editing always bumps the post.


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Writing generally here.. No, I don't think you should act as some kind of censor even under these circumstances. Leave your powers of deletion in the box. For me it would boil down to how fussed you could be. Ideally, you'd write a competing answer and rely on the community to upvote/downvote, such that over time one would expect the answer's score to ...


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It's not a particularly great question, but it's getting upvotes because people generally have a sense of humor. The most popular answer is humorous but at the expense of a particular subset of cyclist that the rest of the population tends to poke fun at. Not saying this is appropriate or acceptable behavior, just answering your question... The site, and ...


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Generally open-ended "shopping" questions are frowned upon. See Let's Go Shopping! There are probably 100 "What kind of bike should I buy?" questions posted already, so you should probably start by searching for those. You will likely notice that the better questions have specific criteria - like this one about a bike for recreation and fitness that will ...


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Yes. The user is clearly interested in proof-reading and is being helpful. One thing that makes the site easier to use and easier to search is when words are spelled correctly and grammar is reasonable. If someone wants to spend time working on that good on them. Reputation harvesting this way is very tedious but for a complete newbie it's one of the few ...


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Yes, I think diet should be merged into nutrition and set as a synonym. Update: and now it is done.


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Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible